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African American Intellectual History Society
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    By horse and buggy, or maybe even on foot, on July 29, 1872 William H. Wilson made the trek from East or West Baltimore, Maryland down to the city’s Southside to purchase land. Feeling the optimism of the time, Wilson must have been full of pride when he handed the full amount of $6.00 to […]

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    Several months before its debut, Edward Baptist’s book “The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism made waves. The book garnered negative and controversial attention with an unnamed review published by The Economist back in September. The author’s comments went something like this: “Almost all the blacks in his book […]

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  • 10/21/15--04:00: James Baldwin Review
  • In his 2010 CD Sophomore Slump, the Jackson, Mississippi-based artist Skipp Coon rapped in the opening track “James,” “From where I stand, freedom is more important than fame” and asked, “Who want to be James? I won’t stop until my project windows can see the flames.” A clear and creative reference to James Baldwin’s 1963 […]

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    At the recent conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH), a few of our bloggers had the opportunity to discuss AAIHS with several academic publishers. We were excited to learn that acquisitions editors read the blog regularly and even used it as a recruiting tool for potential authors. […]

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    Recent events at the University of Missouri-Columbia have captured the attention of people across the country. They have certainly impacted me. As a black alumnus of a predominantly white institution, I marveled as students in Columbia shed light on the ways in which their PWI has struggled to transcend its past policy and culture of […]

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    The upcoming year promises to be an exciting one for the African American Intellectual History Society. Not only is the organization undergoing a period of tremendous growth, it is also hosting its first conference, New Perspectives on the Black Intellectual Tradition, at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. A two-day event taking place on March […]

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    This is a guest post by Walter Greason, a professor of History at Monmouth University. Dr. Greason writes about world, economic, and intellectual history. He serves as the Treasurer for the Society for American City and Regional Planning History. His most recent book, Suburban Erasure: How the Suburbs Ended the Civil Rights Movement in New […]

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    When the topic of gentrification is at hand, recent headlines suggest the stakes of the debate. “Gentrification Isn’t a Benign

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    Nowhere does ‘the perfect become the enemy of the good’ so incessantly than in contemporary debates over reparations. Perhaps this

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    Can academic philosophy be a resource for understanding and enriching African American life? A growing contingent of students and scholars

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    This post is part of my blog series that announces the release of new films in African American History and African Diaspora

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    In all likelihood, the progressive slogan—“Another city is possible”—grew from the ashes of the 1967 Detroit Rebellion. While many will

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    On April 22, 1820, Thomas Jefferson captured the crux of America’s race problem in a letter to Maine politician John

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    After hunkering down through this year’s particularly devastating hurricane season, many Caribbean islands are turning their efforts to recovery and

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    This post is part of our blog series that announces the publication of selected new books in African American History

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    Black Perspectives, the blog of the African American Intellectual History Society (AAIHS), is hosting an online forum on Race, Property, and Economic History. The forum begins

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    On August 18, 2016, the United Nations Working Group on Experts of People of African Descent determined that the history

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    In 1910, 48-year-old Rebecca Sallee fell into an open hole on a city street in Harrodsburg, Kentucky, as she made